Dan Sandman

#32 The Full Cupboard of Life

In Adventure, Books, Comedy, Crime, Fiction on 04/08/2017 at 12:00 pm

#32 The Full Cupboard of LifeBotswana is a moral playground in this novel from the No. Ladies’ Detective Agency series. With his infectiously sunny outlook, Alexander McCall Smith cries in favour of the traditional Botswana values that stand for honesty and hard work. In this fifth installment, such principles are under threat from cowboy mechanics and gold-digger boyfriends. As ever, with her perfect blend of feminine intuition and common-sense, private detective Mma Ramotswe sets out to fight for the old Botswana ways her father believed in. As with the other books within the series, McCall Smith promotes an optimistic view of Botswana and Southern Africa in general; highlighting the generosity, compassion and courage of its people with his deceptively simple prose. On the surface, he provides his many fans with hours of comic fun; but underneath lies a moral philosophy which reveals his academic background and life experience. These popular books can be enjoyed entertainment or read as guides on how to live a moral and happy life in an ever-changing world. I think we would all benefit from a cup of bush tea with Mma Ramotswe, Mma Makutsi and Mr J.L.B Matekoni.

#31 Nutshell

In Books, Fiction, Plays on 28/07/2017 at 12:00 pm

#30 NutshellThis novel is an interesting take on the Hamlet story. Inside his pregnant mother’s stomach, a foetus observes a conspiracy to murder. Using poison, with her brother-in-law Claude, the murderous Trudy plans to kill her husband. Like Shakespeare, Ian McEwan has us peer into the mind of his hero. As Shakespeare uses the confiding address of the soliloquy, McEwan employs the instancy of the first person. In both cases, we are privy to the philosophical outbursts of an immature man (foetus).

I am tempted to think of Stewie from hit television comedy Family Guy. In similarity to the talking baby in that show, Hamlet and the foetus have an ironic sense of humour that veers close to the darker side of humanity. Now all we need is a version where Hamlet discusses such things as philosophy with a talking dog. I’m sure somebody is thinking up the idea right now as I type.

#30 The Time Machine

In Adventure, Books, Fiction, Science Fiction on 21/07/2017 at 12:00 pm

#30 The Time MachineAn intrepid Time Traveler calls a dinner party of distinguished fellows to discuss his time machine. The guests leave skeptical, despite the Time Traveler’s convincing scientific arguments. Later, the Time Traveler returns from a week-long adventure far into the distant future. His story is of two separate species evolved from the British class system: the first group are benign, live in the upperworld, and great the Time Traveler with garlands of flowers; the second group are hostile, live in the underworld, and steal the time machine from our hero. As he attempts to understand the future of planet earth, the Time Traveler must rescue his machine and return to his guests in time for dinner. On his way back home, he accidentally shoots far, far, far ahead in time to witness the destruction of all life as we know it. In one final twist, after telling his story, both he himself and the time machine disappear in front of our eyes. The whole fantastic tale is around one hundred pages long and has remained in print for over a century. It is a thought-provoking adventure story and the work of a great prophetic imagination.

Thanks must go to the good folks at Primrose Hill Community Library who got this latest edition in for me by request (excellent introduction). They also got in The Island of Doctor Moreau. Great little library!