Dan Sandman

39: The Making of Modern Britain by Andrew Marr

In Books, History, Non-Fiction on 23/09/2016 at 12:00 pm

the-making-of-modern-britain-by-andrew-marrThe start of the twentieth century marks a dramatic turning point in British history. Queen Victoria was reaching the end of her long life, having ruled for sixty-four years over the greatest empire the world has ever seen. In an era before radio and television, music halls entertained the masses in huge urban auditoriums. Gathering in the passageways of overcrowded slum housing, the urban working classes drank from shared water pumps and uncomfortably breathed beneath a thick, polluted fog. Beyond the charity of wealthy philanthropists, there was no support for anyone unlucky enough to fall ill or loose their job. Britain may have been the wealthiest country in the world, but it functioned without the publicly funded hospitals and benefits systems we have in place today. Woman were classed as second class citizens, unable to vote or own property. Beyond the kind of violent revolutions seen elsewhere, something had to be done to address the gulfs between the classes and the sexes. There would be many complaints from the more conservative quarters of the old establishment, but Britain was progressively becoming more liberal and more democratic, with socialism also beginning to play an important role within British politics. Meanwhile, as his aunt lay on her deathbed, the queen’s nephew Kaiser Wilhelm II was beginning to strut up and down the deck of his newly built navy’s flagship.

This book grabs readers by the scruff of the neck, dragging them from Victoria’s death to the end of the Second World War. The pace is fast, with each of the four parts of history covered (e.g. 1919-1939) being given a title and around one hundred pages of text. Writing for the BBC viewing British public, Andrew Marr does not write overly academic essays; instead Marr adopts an anecdotal style but is nonetheless authoritative, listing many of his sources in the notes section at the back of the book. His approach to history is to focus on a particular event or character, bridging out to broader issues from there. This makes the whole work very readable, and is one reason why the book version of the television series has been a bestseller. In a way, Marr is following a long line of journalists who have worked prolifically to feed the British public’s need for news, views and opinion. In order to achieve such a mammoth task, he appears regularly on television as a presenter and political commentator, writes for the national newspapers as often as he can, and composes books of both non-fiction and fiction — when he not busy filling in his journal with the day’s events.

I should imagine that such a prominent journalist has a pretty tight schedule — as well as access to the contact details of every important person in the country and beyond. It is therefore admirable that Mr. Marr still has time to support the community he lives in here in Primrose Hill. Whereas most of us average folk go about our daily business making little impact on the thoughts of NHS workers in Birmingham or Scottish nationalists in Dumfries and Galloway, such esteemed journalists — some of which I happen to occasionally see walking along Chalcot Road on a Friday afternoon — are in the business of forming public opinion on a grand scale. The whole thing must be incredibly tiring and stressful, but some people thrive in such environments.

Personally, I prefer the less significant work of publishing here every Friday afternoon at 12 o’ clock precisely.

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