Dan Sandman

#13 Sapiens

In Books, History, Non-Fiction, Science on 24/03/2017 at 12:00 pm

#13 SapiensWilliam Golding said that courteous historians will generally concede that written history is a branch of fiction. If one believes this to be the case, than one is freed to enjoy history books as pastimes, or judge them by the quality of the writing. Most history books fail to tap into the best seller market because they are stuffy and academic texts written by stuffy and academic historians. Sapiens, on the other hand, is bubbly, antagonistic and–to use that most twenty-first century of words–cool. As fiction, it attempts the impossible and arrogant task of pigeonholing the whole history of humankind into five hundred pages. This is all achieved with clean prose, alongside pictures and diagrams, organized into twenty chapters. As a set of essays, it forms an intertwined series of convincing arguments, questioning the pillars of civilization: money, science, religion, culture and history itself. Yuval Noah Harari is perhaps the Montaigne of our day, condensing a great deal of reading into popular arguments aimed at the layman. His final chapters on the scientific revolution, like the book of Revelations, argue that humanity is heading towards its own destruction. This idea is pure science fiction, and hardly anymore visionary than an episode of Star Trek, but entertaining nonetheless.

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